Literary Fraud and Celtic Romanticism in Britain 1750-1850

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NEW! Literary Fraud and Celtic Romanticism in Britain 1750-1850
4 sessions, 10 hours

In the late 18th and early 19th century, literary Brits found themselves drawn into the romance of Celtic traditional materials and the Scottish highlands—and if they didn’t exist, they created them. Claiming they came from ancient highland sources, they opened the door for a century of diverse writings that reveal the powerful attraction of all things Gaelic. Writers that will be explored during this course include Scotsman James Macpherson and his cycle of epic poems based on Oisín, son of the legendary Irish hero Fionn mac Cumhaill, the Welsh Iolo Morganwg, Robert Burns, and Sir Walter Scott. Dr. Gray’s PowerPoint-illustrated lectures include many images and selections from the writings and each class includes a half-hour at the end for discussion.

Instructor: Karen Gray, Ph.D., received her S.T.B. degree from Harvard Divinity School and her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh where her thesis was on “Religious Atheism in Contemporary Western Thought: A Christian Problem and a Buddhist Perspective.” She recently retired after 20 years with the Smithsonian Associates designing adult study tours. She has had a lifelong fascination with the world’s religions which she approaches with openness and from a scholarly perspective.

ILR784 Literary Fraud and Celtic Romanticism in Britain 1750-1850
4-Digit Number: 3612
Friday, 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Apr. 14 – May 5
Location: Conference Center (E Building) /E106
Tuition: $39   Fee: $90    Total: $129
MD residents age 60+ pay fee only

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