MWT Controversy – Poverty & Violence

Gary Haugen: is founder and president of International Justice Mission.

Before founding IJM in 1997, Gary was a human rights attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, where he focused on crimes of police misconduct. In 1994, he served as the Director of the United Nations’ investigation in the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide. In this role, he led an international team of lawyers, criminal prosecutors, law enforcement officers, and forensics experts to gather evidence that would eventually be used to bring the perpetrators of the genocide to justice.

Gary has been recognized by the U.S. State Department as a Trafficking in Persons “Hero” – the highest honor given by the U.S. government for anti-slavery leadership. His work to protect the poor from violence has been featured by Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, the New Yorker, The Times of India, Forbes, U.S. News and World Report, the Guardian and National Public Radio, among many other outlets. He is the author of several books, including Good News About Injustice (Intervarsity Press) and, most recently, The Locust Effect (Oxford University Press).

Thoughts & Questions for Discussion

• Is compassion really the key? What about outrage?
• Does America’s criminal justice system help the poor?
• In America, do the police prevent or perpetuate violence in high-poverty areas?
• Would our own system work any better in other countries?
• Has increased incarceration in high poverty areas helped or hurt?
• Todd R. Clear at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, argues that incarceration contributes to the very social problems it is intended to solve. Imprisoning Communities
• US Poverty and non-fatal violent crime statistics
• What role does education really play in poverty and violence? Coleman Report
• We know that education helps, but is it the material learned that helps, or something more?
• Violent crime and the teenage brain – challenging old ideas
• What is The Girl Effect?

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